kanelbullar (swedish cinnamon buns)

outoftheoven2

With each day that passes, I feel more and more blessed to be in Malmö, Sweden. Each morning, Aaron and I have woken to dappled light through curtains and the gentle sound of waves against the nearby pier.

Upon entering the kitchen, we’ve been met with a heaving table full of rye bread, cold cuts, various cheeses, jordgubbe marmelad (strawberry jam), fruit, butter and hot tea. The generosity of this spread has only been surpassed by the warmth of my Uncle and Aunt’s hospitality; they are truly the most beautiful of people and I feel blessed to call them family.

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Despite suffering from a persistent cold over the past week, I’ve seen quite a lot of the Southern part of Sweden (Skåne). We’ve eaten fried herring and gravadlax (cured salmon) by the seaside, climbed the rocks of Ales Stenar in Kåseberga and toured the town of Ystad (of Henning Mankell’s Wallander fame). We’ve also taken multiple trips down to Malmö harbor to sit, breathe and watch the sun set. 

Last week, we also become acquainted with a Swedish specialty, Kalles Kaviar and uh… the video series below pretty much reflects my tasting experience. Let’s just call it ‘Swedish Vegemite‘.

 

However, despite the negative Kalles experience, there are many Swedish foods that I’ve actually loved. Surprisingly, one is Mimosa Sallad (a mixture of fruit and mayonnaise, to be eaten with cold cuts and bread) which I’ve pretty much eaten every morning since I arrived. Yes, I dislike mayonnaise, but… it’s good. Go figure.

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Last Sunday, my Uncle and Aunt also treated me to a day of Swedish cooking lessons, beginning with Kanelbullar (Swedish cinnamon buns) and ending with Köttbullar (Swedish meatballs).

After an afternoon of kneading, mixing, frying, chatting and drooling in a cinnamon-scented cloud, the entire family came over for a traditional Swedish dinner: piles of köttbullar, boiled potatoes, peas, brown gravy and lingon sylt (lingonberry jam) followed by hot coffee and warm kanelbullar.

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Aaron and I were in Swedish food heaven. So were the rest of the family, judging from the contented sounds and expressions around the table. By the end of the night, our table of seven adults and two children had devoured around thirty kanelbullar. It’s not our fault, they were baked whilst the köttbullar were frying, so… uh, we ate a few as an entree. And a few more with hot milk before going to bed.

Warm cinnamon buns can do that to you.

My Uncle and Aunt were both kind enough to share their recipes with me so that both you and I could reproduce traditional Swedish fare at home. Today I’m sharing my Uncle’s recipe for kanelbullar (which was passed to him from his friend Annette) so get ready to enter your own cinnamon scented cloud of sweet content…

outoftheoven

Kanelbullar (Swedish Cinnamon Buns)

Makes 40

Please note: I had a little bit of trouble with metric conversions (as Swedish cooks tend to use ‘litres’ and ‘decilitres’ for measurement of dry ingredients) but hopefully the quantities below are correct; please let me know if you have any difficulties.

Dough:

  • 50g fresh yeast
  • 150g salted butter or margarine
  • 500ml milk
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 175g white caster sugar
  • 1.5kg plain flour

Melt the butter in a small saucepan over low heat. Add the milk, salt and sugar into the butter, then heat until ‘finger warm’ (lukewarm). Transfer into a large bowl and crumble in the fresh yeast. Stir until completely dissolved.

flourbowlf

At this point you can either use your hands (old-fashioned kneading) or use a mixer with a dough hook attachment. If using a mixer, gradually add in the flour until the mixture forms a ball (there should be no visible flour left in the bowl). The dough should be smooth and non-sticky to touch. Cover with a clean tea-towel and leave in a warm, draught-free place to rest for 30 minutes.

If hand-kneading, turn the mixture out onto a clean, floured surface when the flour is thoroughly combined. Knead until the dough is smooth and non-sticky (my Finnish/Swedish aunty said that her mother used to ‘throw the dough on the table for the yeast to activate’). Return to the bowl, cover with a clean tea-towel and leave in a warm, draught-free place for 30 minutes or until doubled in size.

dough

Whilst the dough is resting, make your filling as follows.

ingredients

Filling:

  • 120g salted butter or margarine, softened
  • 1 1/2 tbsp vanilla sugar*
  • 100g white caster sugar
  • 1 1/2 tbsp powdered cinnamon
  • to glaze: 1 free-range egg, lightly whisked

Add all ingredients to a bowl and whisk by hand or with a whisk attachment until smooth, thick and creamy.

* If you can’t find vanilla sugar, just add in an extra tablespoon of caster sugar and about 1/2 tsp vanilla bean paste.

filling

Set aside in a cool place (not the fridge, as it’ll be too difficult to spread later) until the dough is thoroughly rested.

To assemble:

Set out two flat oven trays. Place 20 paper patty pan cases onto each, then set aside.

Prepare the kanelbullar: after 30 minutes, your dough should have doubled in size. Turn it onto a floured surface and punch out the air. Cut the dough into four pieces for easy rolling, then roll the first piece into a large rectangle (about 5mm thick).

preparingdough1 fillingspread

Evenly spread 1/4 of the cinnamon filling over the dough with a butter knife or spatula.

Roll the dough away from you into a tight cylinder.

roll cut

Cut into ten pieces (about 3cm for each), then place each piece into a patty pan case (cut side up).

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Repeat with the rest of the dough and filling.

Cover each tray of kanelbullar with a clean tea-towel and leave in a warm, draught-free place for another 30 minutes or until doubled in size.

Half way through the second resting time, pre-heat your oven to 225 degrees C (435 degrees f). When the kanelbullar have rested, use a pastry brush to glaze each bun with beaten egg.

glaze1 glaze2

Bake each tray for 8-10 minutes or until risen and light golden brown.

These buns are best eaten warm, straight out of the oven with a hot cup of coffee. They definitely won’t last long (the picture below is annoyingly out of focus as little fingers were moving too fast… but I love it anyway. My cousin’s five year old daughter managed to eat five kanelbullar on her own, with keen fingers and an excited grin. Impressive!).

aliciabullar

If you don’t consume these buns within two days, freeze them in an airtight container or bag for up to one month (just microwave each bun for a few seconds until warm and soft again).

läcker!

five days in paris

galerielafayetteroofIt’s just past seven in the evening in sunny Malmö, Sweden. I’m sitting on my Uncle and Aunt’s balcony, nursing a can of Brygg (Swedish beer) as the sun slowly dips over the Öresund sound.

It’s very peaceful here. Peaceful and restorative, which is wonderful in consideration of my recently-acquired head cold. I spent the majority of a sunny Tuesday in bed, cursing the result of five wet days in the Parisian rain. As our Air bnb host (Luc Perrin) sympathised, “…vous êtes très malchanceux!” (‘you are very unlucky!’). But regardless, we enjoyed every minute.

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aaronmapNow, I should probably write a forewarning on this post: it’s very picture heavy. Aaron and I were kind of (or a lot) overwhelmed by the sheer beauty of the city itself, never mind the abundance of food.

I’m not going to attempt to produce any sort of ‘city guide’ in this post as we were only in Paris for five poorly-researched rainy days (Aaron actually called me a ‘bad foodie’ as I had no idea where to eat; uh, guilty as charged). However, if you’d like some more extensive (and well-researched) notes on food stalls, attractions and restaurants, I’d encourage you to head over to Erika’s blog The Pancake Princess for her Europe travel update or Erin’s blog The Law Student’s Wife for a beautiful recap of her and Ben’s recent trip to Paris and other regions of France. Both blogs are guaranteed to pull you into the rich and delicious tapestry of French cuisine and culture.

So, without further ado: here’s our Paris scrapbook. I hope that you enjoy the visual journey.

fruitAll of the berries.

I was squealing over these plump little beauties like a child in a candy store. They put Australian berries to shame with their smooth, glossy skins and juicy, sweet flesh. I bought every type I could see and devoured them exuberantly, with keen fingers, stained teeth and juice running down my chin.

berries cherries

Markets.

Oh, the markets. Near our accommodation in Montmartre, each and every street was blessed with small shops selling everything from fromage (cheese) to fruits de mer (seafood). I wanted to buy everything from every boulangerie (bakery) and all of the beurre (butter) I could see.

I would fly to France just for the butter.

butcher rotisserie salami seafoodshop seafood yoghurt2

Stohrer.

This shop deserves its own category. Established in 1730 by King Louis XV’s pastry chef Nicolas Stohrer, the oldest pastry shop in Paris continues to produce wonderfully intricate delights for the general public 7 days per week. Stohrer – Patissier Traiteur – 51 Rue Montorgueil 75002, Paris.

stohrersaladbar stohrer stohrerpies stohrersaladHappy hour.

Usually from about 17:00 to 21:00 (5pm to 9pm) in almost every Parisian bar and bistro. Cheap pints and cocktails. Do eeeeet.

pub tableartStreet art.

Aaron and I are suckers for all sorts of meaningful graffiti and well-placed street embellishments. There are many wonderful pieces to see all over Paris. These are just a few of our snaps.

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People in places.

And lots of pigeons.

pigeonfeeding people chezmarianne windowBaguettes.

Even on magnets, apparently. I ate half a baguette almost every morning, slathered with French butter and confiture (jam). After two days I started copying the local Parisians by dipping my folded baguette into hot coffee. So delicious.

magnetsbread

Oh, and buttery, flaky croissants. Yes.

croissantsThe greenest jardins (gardens).

Most of these photographs were taken at Le Jardin des Plantes. They’ve hardly been edited; the stunning shades of green seemed other-worldly for this Australian who struggles to keep pot plants alive.

jardindesplantes trees flowers applesSights.

Almost every building, bridge and road you see in Paris contains ridiculous beauty and cultural significance. We have about three hundred photographs in tribute to this. Here’s 1%.

louvre tube locksSo that’s the end of chapter one of our European sojourn. Stay tuned for sweet stories of meatballs, lingonsylt, gravadlax, Swedish rye bread and time spent with family in Malmö. Very soon.

barbecued chilli con carne with beer

Chilli Con Carne-2074

In case you missed my last post, Aaron and I are now three days into a European adventure which began in Paris on Wednesday 9th July, 2014. To keep the blog running during my absence, a few wonderful blogger friends have offered to contribute guest recipe posts for your reading (and cooking) pleasure over the next few months (yes, the blogger network is amazing).

First off the block is my talented friend Matt, a mutual Mexican food and beer lover who blogs over at Inspired Food. As he mentions below, we met last year at the Eat Drink Blog conference hosted by Perth City Farm and ever since, we’ve maintained a passionate dialogue about everything food and beer related (yeah, you could say that the post below perfectly encapsulates our foodie friendship!).

I’ll be posting a travel update soonish (with plenty of photographs of golden croissants, warm brioche, soft white cheese and wild strawberries… don’t hate me) but for now, it’s over-and-out as I hand over to Matt! Enjoy!


It’s mid afternoon. The sun is hidden behind an army of clouds, occasionally peeking its head through the cracks. The wind has a cold sting as it brushes past my face and I take comfort in the warmth radiating from the charcoal barbecue. Smoke fills the air as a cast iron pot simmers away, filling my soul with joy about what’s to come…

You see, I’ve been sitting here for over three hours watching the barbecue and tending to that cast iron pot of goodness (ensuring I don’t burn down the backyard!). Thankfully I’m sitting with good company and an Esky full of cold beer (I’m sure Laura would agree that it is never too cold for beer, especially when there is a barbecue involved! Yes, Laura does!).

That is all it takes: a little time, a little fire, a little beer and some of your favourite people.

Chilli Con Carne-2007

Hi, my name is Matt. For those of you who haven’t noticed me stalking this page, I too run a little recipe blog over at Inspired Food. Laura and I have known each other for quite some time now, initially coming across each others blogs in cyberspace and eventually meeting up at the Eat Drink Blog conference in 2013. Since then, there have been a number of awesome dinners (The Moroccan Table and The Spanish Table) with Laura and her husband Aaron, Jemima (from Feed your Soul, Perth) and her sister Lexi, Alyssa (my beautiful girlfriend) and of course myself. I’m sure there will be many more to come.

When Laura asked for contributions from guest bloggers while she travels the northern hemisphere, I jumped straight in and volunteered to spend some of my time rambling. This was more of a natural instinct to help a friend out and I hadn’t actually given much thought as to what I would post about. After many late nights trawling the internet, searching through my cookbooks and watching reruns of Jamie Oliver (ok, yes that is just a regular occurrence but shhh!) I finally came up with the perfect post.

Chilli Con Carne-1994

You see, Laura and I share some common interests: we both love beer, we both love Mexican food and we both love Jamie Oliver’s style of cooking. Naturally, once I realized this, all I had to do was combine these three things and I’d be onto a winner.

Combining beer, Mexican and a ‘Jamie approach’ to cooking was really easy once I came to that conclusion. I had just watched episode two of Jamie’s American Road Trip (you know, the one where he hangs out with the cowboys and makes his cowboy chilli?) and that was my inspiration for this post. I wanted to feel the heat from the barbecue, drink beer and cook something amazing.

Chilli Con Carne-2005

I have always wanted to cook something with beef brisket but it’s quite difficult to find here in Australia. Supermarkets tend to favour corned Silverside. I’d suggest you give your butcher a call a few days before to make sure they carry it (and if they don’t they will have time to get it in). Brisket is the perfect cut of beef for slow cooking; granted there is a little preparation involved but it is well worth it. The beer adds a lot of body to the chilli and depending on the type of beer you choose, the options are endless.

Below you will find my recipe for a Tex-Mex style ‘Beer Chilli Con Carne’. Inspired (of course) by Jamie Oliver’s cowboy chilli (‘Chilli Con Jamie‘).

Chilli Con Carne-2062

Barbecued Chilli Con Carne with Beer (of course)

Serves 6-8 hungry people

What you’ll need:

  • 2kg beef brisket, cut into 3 cm cubes
  • 2 red onions, sliced
  • 5 gloves of garlic, roughly chopped
  • 2 fresh long red chillies, chopped
  • 1 tbsp cumin
  • 1 tbsp smoked paprika
  • 2 cinnamon sticks
  • 1 tsp chilli powder (add more if you like it hot)
  • 1 bottle of beer (pick your favourite, I used about 500ml of India Pale Ale)
  • 4x 400g tins of tomatoes 
  • 1 square of dark chocolate
  • 400g tin of red kidney beans (or your favourite bean) 
  • 2 capsicums (bell peppers), sliced
  • a handful of chopped coriander (cilantro) roots
  • sour cream, to serve
  • coriander (cilantro) leaves, to garnish 
  • rice and flat bread to serve

Now What?

This couldn’t be easier to make, simply get your barbecue started, add a splash of oil, add the onions and chillies and cook for 3-4 minutes until softened.

Chilli Con Carne-2015

Add the spices and cook for another 2 minutes.

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Then add the beer and continue to cook for a further 5 minutes.

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Add the tomatoes, mashing up any whole ones with the back of the spoon. Add the chocolate, coriander (cilantro) roots and meat.

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Mix well, cover and cook for 3 hours or until the meat pulls apart with a couple of forks.

Add the beans and capsicums (and more chilli if your game). Then cook for a further 30 minutes.

Remove the lid, add the sour cream, coriander and start eating. This is best served with rice and flat bread (like warm tortillas) with plenty of cold beers. 

Chilli Con Carne-2074

Thanks again Matt for an incredible guest post… I am definitely trying this recipe as soon as I get home! For more inspiration from Matt, please check out his blog (Inspired Food) and associated facebook, Instagram and twitter!

Chilli Con Carne-1998

writing process blog tour

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In exactly one week’s time, I will be dragging a suitcase through the cobbled streets of Montmarte, Paris. I will be basking in French sunshine, buttering chunks of crisp baguette and selecting macarons from the hallowed halls of Laduree. Granted, I will also be suffering from jetlag but… hey, I won’t care. I’ll officially be on holidays (insert grin here).

Despite recklessly embracing a holiday mindset, my aim is for this blog to continue to produce quality content throughout the entirety of my European sojourn. Yes, there will be a few travel updates here and there, but I’m aiming for the bulk of posts to contain recipes – both of my own creation and that of some incredibly talented blogging friends.

First up this month will be Matt from Inspired Food with a delicious recipe for a slow-cooked barbecue feast (how he managed to create, write and photograph it in the middle of house building and puppy buying, I have no idea, but I’m glad he did!). I’ve also got Alice from Hip Foodie Mom and Ali from Milk & Cereal waiting in the wings, so get ready for some drool-worthy recipe content over the next couple of months!

Anyway, back to today’s post: the Writing Process Blog Tour. If you haven’t heard of the concept yet, the ‘tour’ is basically a nominated chain of posts from bloggers who write about… well, writing. As you will see below, you receive four designated questions that explore individual writing projects and technique. I have no idea where the chain originated but if you simply Google ‘Writing Process Blog Tour’ you’ll see that there have been lots of posts. Lots. A cool 20 million or so.

I received two invitations to take part from bloggers whom I admire greatly, Susan at The Wimpy Vegetarian and Wendy from Chez Chloe. Despite some initial reluctance on my part (if you’ve been reading this blog for a while you’ll realize that I very rarely participate in chain activities) I decided that it would be a useful exercise for me to reflect upon why I do what I do. That is, how and why do I blog?

So, below you will find my responses to the Writing Process Blog Tour. I’ve decided against nominating any particular bloggers to continue the chain; however if you’re interested in taking part, let me know in the comments section below (you would be most welcome!).

The four questions:

1. What am I working on?

This is a big question. To answer succinctly (but rather ambiguously) I’d probably just say ‘lots of things’ but to break it down a bit further: I’m in the middle of writing a recipe for cinnamon apple cheesecake for this blog, I’ve got a half-finished novel on my laptop, I’m still attempting to update my second (much neglected) blog, Second-Hand Stories, I’m writing a recipe column for the Challenge newspaper, I’m editing a photographic shoot for a client and I’m developing recipes and doing some writing for a cookbook (no other information to be disclosed as yet!). Oh, and I also work full-time. It’s rather busy… but fun.

2. How does my work differ from others of its genre?

I don’t really know if my blog differs from others of its genre; you (the reader) would probably be a better judge of that. However, if I was pressed for an answer I’d probably respond by saying that Laura’s Mess is a little less styled and more narrative-based than other food blogs. I like engaging in big, fat, juicy prose. I can be overly wordy on occasion. Rather frequently, my photographs are more of food or ingredients in their natural state than a styled finished product. I’m fascinated by tiny details. I never post a recipe unless I’m happy with the narrative that comes before it. I like to feel what I’m writing. I also despise obligations to post competitively in the over-saturated realm of food blogging, so… well, I doubt that I’ll ever become one of those ultra-successful people with lots of paid advertising, sponsors and a million submissions to Foodgawker. But that’s okay with me.

3. Why do I write what I do?

This is an easy one. I love food. I love eating it, creating it, writing about it and discovering its origins. I love sitting back with my eyes closed, thinking of rich descriptives and onomatopoeia. I love playing with colours, creating patterns and discovering new flavour profiles. I love making food from my past that rekindles positive associations. I also adore the aesthetic of food… textures, colours, dappled light and splatters of sticky sauce. That makes the photography aspect come easily. It would be truthful to say that I’ve always written about food. Last year, my husband and I discovered a ‘travel diary’ from the USA and Europe that I had written as a ten year old child. Underneath the battered cover were pages and pages of scribbled paragraphs and drawings of… you guessed it, food. At least you can describe me as ‘consistent’!

4. How does my writing process work?

My favourite place to write is on the three-seater couch by our tiny balcony. There’s a lot of natural light and a skyline for when my eyes get tired. On weekend mornings, my ritual is to make a cup of tea (usually Rooibos, occasionally Earl Grey or Chai with soy milk and honey) before sitting down with my notes and the laptop for a couple of hours. On weeknights, I wait until after dinner (when Aaron retreats to his study) before sitting with the computer and a Hendricks with tonic, ice and muddled rosemary… or a glass of red wine. I prefer silence when I write. It allows me to become lost in my own thoughts, recollections and senses. However, despite saying that I will occasionally sit and write at a nearby cafe or my local wine bar (with some good bread and labne) if I want to escape the house.

So that’s it. Profound? Uh, don’t answer that. Now, as previously mentioned, I’m supposed to end this post by passing the metaphorical baton onto three other bloggers who may want to share their own responses as part of the Writing Process Blog Tour. Are you keen? Let me know in the comments below!

With The Grains

Whole Grains and Wanderings

Cashew Kitchen

vibrant food. quiet soul. wild at heart.

Brooklyn Homemaker

modern classic recipes, story telling, and a little bit of history. Oh yeah, and schnauzers.

better than a bought one

as homemade should be

My Sweet Precision

Where flour, butter, and sugar collide

Chompchomp

Perth Food Blog | Restaurant Reviews | Food & Travel Blog | Gluten Free

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Deliciousy Green...