my favourite potato salad

likeyWhilst wandering my local farmer’s market last weekend, I noticed a large basket of dark, speckled tubers labelled purple congo potatoes. They were fascinating, thin and knobbly like kipflers wrapped in dusty black strips of parchment.

Being a sucker for new ingredients, I soon filled a bag and squirreled it home with fresh asparagus, artichokes and golden cherry tomatoes. Four days later, I threw together my default potato salad as a contribution to a barbecue at a friend’s place.

pinenuts springonions

This potato salad isn’t your typical run-of-the-mill mayonnaise fest. By incorporating creamy goats cheese, extra virgin olive oil, balsamic and a splash of bacon fat, the salad retains just the right amount of creaminess without masking the freshness of the boiled potatoes, herbs and cherry tomatoes.

Salty bacon adds some savoury complexity whilst toasted pine nuts add a sprinkle of necessary crunch. It’s the kind of salad that I can’t get enough of, as there’s variance in every bite.

purplespuds purplecut

As you can tell from the photographs above, purple congos aren’t the most attractive of the tuber family. They’re rather squat, ribbed and speckled, bearing more resemblance to excrement than food. Their flesh is dry and rather floury after cooking so I definitely wouldn’t recommend them for roasting or chips. When boiled, they retain a firm but dry texture that soaks up butter or olive oil beautifully. They’re also wonderful in creamy (purple) mash.

This salad doesn’t have to be made from purple congo potatoes; in fact, it works even better with other waxy or all-rounder potatoes such as spuntas, Ruby Lou, Dutch creams, kipflers or bintjes. The only advantage of the purple congo is its inky colour variance that emerges upon cutting to luckily be retained after cooking.

lemonbowl

As with most other dark-pigmented vegetables (e.g. beetroot, red cabbage) purple congos stain terribly. I’d encourage you to use an old chopping board whilst preparing them. Wash all utensils as soon as possible to prevent staining.

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My Favourite Potato Salad

Serves 6 as a side dish

  • 500g waxy or all-rounder potatoes (I used a mixture of purple congo and royal blue)
  • 200g punnet cherry tomatoes, halved or quartered
  • 175g bacon rashers, finely diced
  • 1/2 Spanish onion, finely diced
  • 1 clove garlic, crushed
  • 4 spring onions (shallots)
  • handful of washed Italian (flat leaf) parsley, chopped
  • zest of 1 lemon (plus some juice)
  • 100g goats cheese, crumbled
  • 50g pine nuts, toasted
  • 1-2 tbsp aged balsamic vinegar
  • extra virgin olive oil
  • sea salt
  • cracked black pepper

Wash your potatoes and remove any eyes or blemished skin. Chop into even pieces (about 2cm x 2cm) and place into a pot of fresh salted water.

potopotatoes

Boil over medium heat until the potatoes are firm but tender (easily pierced with a knife but not falling apart; don’t worry if your water turns blackish-green, that’s normal with purple congos). Drain and place into a large bowl.

In the meantime, heat a good splash of olive oil in a frying pan over medium heat. Add the garlic, bacon and Spanish onion, then cook on low to medium heat until the bacon is crisp and the onion is translucent (about 10 minutes; agitate the pan as required).

baconfry

Add to the still-warm* potatoes (including the residual fat from the pan) with the lemon zest, a squeeze of lemon juice, a good drizzle of balsamic vinegar, olive oil and some salt and pepper. Mix well and set aside to cool slightly.

*adding the dressing to the potatoes whilst they’re still warm allows them to soak up a lot of gorgeous flavour in the dressing. If your potatoes have cooled completely, warm them in the microwave briefly before adding the olive oil, lemon, balsamic and residual bacon fat.

construction

Add in the rest of the ingredients alongside another squeeze of lemon and a drizzle of extra virgin olive oil. Mix well and season to taste.

sidefork

I like to serve this salad alongside some simple grilled meat or fish with another bowl of fresh green leaves.

*It’s also perfect as an abstract take on potato hash: Splash a little bit of oil onto the base of a medium heavy-based pan. Add in enough salad to cover the bottom of the pan. Make a couple of ‘indents’ into which you can crack a couple of eggs. Cook over medium heat until the bottom is crisp and golden and the egg whites are set. Serve with a green salad.

sideplate2 potatoplate fin

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chilli bacon jam

Bacon is a funny thing. To the untrained eye, it’s a pretty ugly piece of meat. Streaked with ribbons of fat, it’s commonly cut from the sides, back or belly of a pig before being cured with copious amounts of sodium chloride (salt) or ‘brine’ (a mixture of salt, sodium ascorbate and potassium nitrate amongst other things). The meat is then air dried, boiled or smoked to in pieces before being sliced and sold in rashers or strips. The end product, as you’d well know, looks like this:


So why is bacon, of all things, loved to the point of absolute fanaticism? The term ‘bacon mania‘ has even been coined to describe the ever-increasing fervency of bacon enthusiasts around the world, particularly in the United States, Canada and other western countries. There are bacon products ranging from painted bacon coffins to an award-winning smoky Bakon Vodka alongside another product appropriately named baconlube (which pushes the boundaries of it’s maker J&D’s tagline, ‘Everything should taste like bacon’). But, ahem… moving on.

According to scientists, the explanation mostly centres around a Japanese term devised in 1908 by Kikunae Ikeda, a Tokyo chemist and university professor. Ikeda’s work isolated a separate taste substance from the four commonly accepted ‘tastes’ of sweet, salty, bitter and sour. He called this new taste ‘umami’, a combination of the Japanese words for ‘delicious’ (umai うまい) and ‘taste’ (mi).

So what’s this got to do with bacon? Well, to throw more science at you, the taste profile of umami comes from the tongue’s detection of an amino acid named L-glutamate. You can read more about the process here, but for the purposes of this blog post all you need to know is that umami basically makes everything taste good. That’s why Ikeda later went on to create and patent a chemical version of umami called monosodium glutamate (MSG), a common additive in Chinese takeaway. But, well… let’s just say the world is slowly rediscovering that natural is better.

Foods rich in umami include most meats, anchovies, Parmesan cheese, ripe tomatoes, soy sauce, shellfish, seaweed and vegetable extracts (Vegemite and Marmite). The good news is bacon has six different types of umami in it. No wonder it tastes so darn good.

Okay. Now that you’ve learnt why you want to eat bacon, I’m going to tell you how you can eat bacon, with a spoon, straight out of a jar. Sound weird? Yep, I thought so too, but after reading this recipe by Martha Stewart I was keen to experiment.

So, fast forward to time spent at a friend’s house drinking mint tea whilst avoiding the nose of a curious Weimaraner. Over the course of an afternoon, we caught up on four weeks worth of conversation whilst chopping bacon, eventually producing a pot full of caramelised boozy relish that, despite initial doubts, was… well, umami in a jar.

Comparing my revised recipe to the original from Martha Stewart, you’ll see that I’ve added a range of aromatics whilst slightly reducing the sugar content. The finished product has lingering chilli heat and the bitterness of coffee whilst also being mellowed by sweet caramelised shallots, earthy maple syrup and brown sugar. It’s perfect straight from the jar, but if you feel like branching out it also partners beautifully with scrambled eggs, soft goat’s cheese, burgers, fresh rocket and crusty sourdough.

To conclude: bacon in a jar? It works. Try it, I’m pretty confident that you’ll be glad you did.

Chilli Bacon Jam
Makes 2 cups

  • 600g good quality smoked rasher bacon
  • 4 eschallots (brown shallots), thinly sliced
  • 3 tbsp packed light brown sugar
  • 2 garlic cloves, minced
  • 2 tsp smoked paprika
  • 1 tsp dried chilli flakes
  • 1/2 tsp ground mustard powder
  • 1/2 tsp ground ginger
  • 1/2 tsp ground cinnamon
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 3/4 cup (180ml/6 fl oz) whisky (substitute with brandy, or just water if preferred)
  • 2/3 cup (160ml/7 fl oz) strong brewed coffee
  • 4 tbsp apple cider vinegar
  • 3 tbsp maple syrup
  • sea salt
  • freshly ground black pepper

Cut your bacon rashers into one inch pieces, then fry them in a large pot with a splash of oil until the meat is crisped and the fat has rendered out. Remove with a slotted spoon, then drain on paper towels. Set aside.

Drain all but 2 tbsp of bacon fat from the pot. Add in your shallots and garlic over medium heat, and cook until the shallots are translucent. Add in the spices, brown sugar, chosen alcohol (if using) and a pinch of salt, cook for 3-4 minutes before adding in your other liquid ingredients: vinegar, coffee and maple syrup. Bring to the boil, then allow the liquid to reduce slightly for about five minutes.

Add in your reserved bacon, then immediately reduce the heat to low. Simmer, covered, for 30 minutes before stirring and allowing the mixture to evaporate. Cook for a further 30 minutes, or until the mixture is darkened, syrupy and fragrant.

Once at the desired consistency, allow the mixture to cool. Skim any oil off the surface with a spoon, and discard it alongside the bay leaves.

Transfer your cooled mixture to the bowl of a food processor. Process until it reaches the consistency of a chunky jam; you should still be able to see crunchy, crisp little bits of bacon amongst the syrupy, boozy spiced shallots. Taste, and add extra salt or pepper as required.

This mixture is delicious warm, eaten in it’s purest form on a slice of freshly toasted baguette. If you’d rather resist it’s syrupy deliciousness, it will keep well in the fridge (stored in sterilised jars or an airtight container) for up to four weeks. Read on for more tips and serving suggestions.

Notes:

  • This jam is not suitable for canning or longer-term preservation, unless you’re following the strict method of ‘pressure canning‘ to minimise risks of spoilage. Meat is a low acid food (with a pH <4.6) so it’s an optimum breeding ground for bacteria if stored over a long period of time. Read more about the risks here.
  • A preferable method for storing the jam for up to three months would be to freeze it in an airtight container. Though if I were you, I’d just get on with eating it as quickly as possible. Then I’d make another batch.
  • If you’re caffeine intolerant or just not into coffee, there’s no harm in removing it from the recipe. Just substitute with the same quantity of water. When added, the coffee contributes a richness, depth of flavour and slight bitterness to counteract the sweet stickiness of the maple syrup and brown sugar. An actual ‘coffee’ flavour is not really detectable. However, if you’re omitting it, just make sure that you taste your mixture for balance. Add extra salt or another splash of raw vinegar if necessary.
  • As per the coffee, there is no need to add alcohol if you don’t like it. Just add in an appropriate amount of water, or even orange juice if desired. If you are into alcohol and want to diverge from the whisky pathway, as mentioned above I’d substitute some good-quality brandy (Cognac, Armagnac).
  • If you really like chilli, you can substitute the dried chilli flakes (or add to them!) with 2 fresh jalapenos (finely chopped), a dollop of Sriracha or chipotles in adobe sauce (2 chillies, finely chopped). I’d also imagine that an injection of fresh orange rind during the cooking process would add another beautiful layer of complimentary flavour. Don’t be afraid to experiment!

This jam tastes good on pretty much everything. My serving suggestions include:

  • slathering it onto a burger bun then topping it with a juicy beef patty, sliced tomatoes and arugula (rocket)
  • eating it thickly spread on crisp crostini with a cloud of soft goat’s cheese (or blue cheese, if you’re brave) and watercress
  • spooning it onto a pile of soft, creamy scrambled eggs then devouring the lot with some thick-sliced, charred sourdough bread or potato rosti
  • spreading it onto one half of a soft white roll, then topping it with piles of fragrant, tender pulled pork (try this amazing recipe for pulled pork by Stephanie Le). Double pork + sticky, boozy chilli sauce = heaven.
  • stuffing it into a chicken breast with soft, mild goat’s cheese or brie, frying the skin til crisp then sticking the lot on a lined baking tray into a preheated oven (180 degrees C / 350 f) for about 20 minutes (or until cooked through). It’d be amazing with a rocket and vine-ripened tomato salad, dressed with aged balsamic, lemon and olive oil.
  • I imagine it’d even taste good in a great big spoonful atop creamy porridge oats, with a crumble of walnuts, though I haven’t ventured that far yet. Most of it’s gone straight into my mouth, from the jar, with a spoon…

Oh, just in case you’re curious, here’s a picture of that beautiful Weimaraner puppy I mentioned earlier in the post. His name’s Royce, and yep, being a puppy he pees everywhere. But he’s still ridiculously cute:

Naw! If I didn’t live in a shoebox I’d take him home…

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