sticky fig, raspberry and chia jam

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I don’t remember when I first discovered chia jam. It must’ve been at least two years ago, possibly via Angela’s beautiful blog, Oh She Glows. Regardless of inspiration, chia jam is a godsend to those who enjoy sweet fruit spreads on buttered toast, scones or puddings. It’s a healthy way to enjoy a thick, glossy jam fix whilst avoiding a ton of refined sugar.

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The chia jam below was the product of a trip to my local market for milk and spelt flour. Whilst walking to the dairy cabinet, I passed a tray of slightly battered figs, the remnants of autumn’s bounty. I dropped a few into a paper bag, contemplating pies and frangipane tarts as I gathered my milk and headed to the check-out.

One hour later, I was eating a buttered scone sandwich with a glossy helping of sticky fig and chia jam.

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As you might have gathered, this recipe is quick and easy to prepare; far removed from the marmalade days of my English youth. Within half an hour, fresh or frozen fruit transforms into a thick, fragrant pool of jammy deliciousness, just begging to be slathered across fresh, crusty bread.

figs closeup

If you’re unfamiliar with chia seeds, their flavour is best described as ‘nutty’ with a pleasant textural ‘pop’. However, within a sweet fruit jam the flavour itself only mildly discernible.

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Most noteworthy is the fact that these sticky seeds provide a healthy whack of omega-3 fatty acids, carbohydrates, protein, fiber, antioxidants and calcium with every mouthful. Definitely a worthy topping for steel-cut oats, thick Greek yoghurt, quinoa porridge… anything, really.

With this type of jam, it’s acceptable to form a habit.

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Sticky Fig, Raspberry and Chia Jam

Makes about 1 cup (250ml)

  • 3/4 cup quartered fresh figs (about 6)
  • 1/4 cup raspberries
  • 2 tbsp pure maple or agave syrup
  • 3/4 cup water
  • 1 tbsp chia seeds
  • 1/2 vanilla bean, seeds scraped out

Bring the figs, maple syrup and 1/2 cup water to the boil over medium heat. Add the vanilla bean, cover and reduce temperature to a simmer. Cook, stirring occasionally, for 10-15 minutes or until the fruit has softened and started to break down. Mash a little with a fork, then pour in the chia seeds (add the other 1/4 cup water if the fluid has reduced too much).

jamcooking

Cook, uncovered, for another 5-10 minutes or until the chia seeds have swelled and the mixture has reached a jammy consistency. Remove from the heat and pour into a sterilized jar or airtight container.

*I haven’t attempted to properly can this jam due to lack of sugar as a preservative, though most recipes suggest it can be stored for up to 7 days in the refrigerator (possibly longer in the freezer).

squashscone

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