rosemary, sea salt and macadamia oil crackers

stackThis Sunday, it will officially be the first day of Australian winter. Three long months of cold nights, overcast days, frosted windows and patchy downpours of variable rain. All-in-all, it sounds pretty miserable. Unless… well, unless you’re someone like me.

I think I’ve mentioned elsewhere on this blog that I love wintry weather and all that it entails; particularly hot soup, slow-cooking and the feel of soft leather against my skin. In fact, I’ve been in my element during this past week of rain. I’ve spent hours pottering in our tiny kitchen, coaxing spelt flour into elastic dough, chia into gel and charred aubergines into creamy bagaghanouj.

All without raising a sweat.

bench

Now, that’s not to say that summer cooking isn’t beautiful in its own way, but have you ever attempted pastry in a heatwave? One word: butter. Or more specifically, melted butter. It’s an absolute nightmare.

Something that’s not a nightmare is the gorgeous cold-pressed macadamia oil produced by the good folks at Brookfarm. Packed with monounsaturates, Omega 3 and 6, Brookfarm’s oil is perfect for quick snacks and salads alike.

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The recipe below is one of my experiments from the weekend-that-was: rustic flatbread crackers made with macadamia oil, fragrant herbs and a touch of flaked sea salt. When baked, we broke bread together, nibbling intermittently whilst sipping on organic red wine. A blissful combination; crunchy, salty and savoury in the most satisfying of ways.

oil

herbs

These crackers are wonderful as part of a cheese platter or as a stand-alone crunchy snack.

However if you’ve got a little time up your sleeve (ha! Who am I kidding) they’d be even better with a smooth, creamy white bean dip (like this one from David Lebovitz) or soft, mild, creamy homemade labne (like this beauty from Julie Goodwin). Snacking at its finest.

flatbreadsRosemary, Sea Salt and Macadamia Oil Crackers

Adapted from this recipe by Epicurious

Makes 3 rounds of about ten crackers

  • 1 3/4 cups plain flour, sifted
  • 1 tbsp roughly chopped rosemary and thyme leaves (plus a few sprigs to decorate)
  • 1 tsp baking powder
  • 3/4 tsp flaked sea salt (plus about 1/4 tsp extra to sprinkle)
  • 1/2 cup water
  • 1/3 cup macadamia oil (I used Brookfarm cold-pressed macadamia oil, you can substitute good olive oil in a pinch)

Set oven at 230 degrees C (450 degrees f). Place two heavy baking trays on the centre shelves of the oven to preheat.

Stir together the flour, chopped herbs, baking powder and salt in a medium bowl.

flourherbMake a well in the centre of the dry ingredients, then add the oil and water. Gradually stir into the flour until a soft, sticky dough forms.

doughTurn out onto a well floured surface and knead for 5 minutes or until a smooth, elastic dough forms.

Divide the dough into 3 pieces. Place a large sheet of baking parchment onto a flat surface and roll out one piece of dough until it is a 10×10 inch round (shape isn’t very important; just ensure that the dough is less than 5mm thick).

doughflat

Transfer the dough onto one of the preheated baking sheets and brush it with some reserved macadamia oil. Sprinkle over some of the residual sea salt and rosemary leaves, pressing lightly to ensure adhesion.

Slide the tray back into the oven and bake for 8-10 minutes or until pale golden with blistered and browned spots (the flatbread should be crisped).

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Repeat process with remaining mixture, macadamia oil, salt and herbs (do not oil the flatbreads until just prior to baking). Once baked, transfer flatbread onto a wire rack to cool. Break into pieces to serve.

Note: Flatbread can be made 2 days ahead and cooled completely, then kept in an airtight container at room temperature for up to two weeks. Brookfarm provided me with a sample of their cold-pressed macadamia oil for recipe testing, however I was not compensated and as always, all opinions are my own.

bowl

brookfarm

 

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alfajores payes – TSP christmas cookie week

stackbutton2It’s 1.23am on Friday 20th December, 2013. Instead of getting ready for bed, I’m kneading a batch of cinnamon shortbread dough. Why? Well, firstly because I promised you a recipe for alfajores payes in this post from almost a fortnight ago. Secondly, because I kinda like my friend Erin from The Speckled Palate.

Erin’s hosting a Christmas Cookie Week this week and today’s the deadline for adding to the gorgeous stack of delights including salted caramel thumbprint cookies, vanilla bean shortbread cookies and classic coconut macaroons (all recipes available via the Christmas Cookie Week link). As abovementioned, by contribution to this week’s cookie goodness is a recipe for alfajores payes, chocolate-coated Argentinean shortbread cookies filled with thick salted dulce de leche caramel.

spreading dish

The recipe I’ve included for alfajores payes was originally sourced here from The Gourmet Traveller. After completing a trial batch, I made some minor changes including a reduction in the diameter of the cookies (my first batch were 6.5cm but I found them to be a little too large, so I’ve reduced the measurement in the recipe to 5.5cm), doubling the amount of cinnamon for spiced goodness (from 1/4 to 1/2 tsp) and adding a sprinkling of sea salt atop the dulce de leche before sandwiching the cookies together (the little ‘pop’ of sea salt flakes adds a gorgeous layer of complexity to this already divine Argentinean biscuit).

I also chose to make the shortbread dough by hand rather than with a food processor, because… well, I’m a bit like that. Floured hands, cold butter and a wooden bench make me feel like I’m doing good in the world.

setup

You may also notice that I’ve dipped my sandwich biscuits into the tempered chocolate rather than spreading it with a pastry brush. This was mainly due to being time poor, however I have included both techniques in the recipe text below. The advantage of brush application is that the top and bottom layers of chocolate set independently, creating a neater finish. Dipping each biscuit is far more efficient but will likely create a ‘foot’ of chocolate that pools as the liquid sets.

As this will likely be my last post before the Christmas arrives, I’d like to wish everyone a blessed, merry and peaceful Christmas week. Thanks for the Christmas wishes and inspiration over the past month!

two

Alfajores Payes (cinnamon shortbread with caramel filling)

Makes 24 sandwich biscuits.

*Begin this recipe one day ahead.

Biscuits:

  • 2 cups (300g) plain flour, sieved
  • 1/4 cup (40g) pure icing sugar, sieved
  • 250g cold unsalted butter
  • 1/2 tsp ground cinnamon

Dulce de leche filling:

  • 395g can sweetened condensed milk, unopened
  • 1 tsp sea salt flakes

To serve:

  • pure icing sugar, to dust, or
  • 150g tempered melted dark chocolate (65% cocoa solids), to coat

For the dulce de leche: Place the can of condensed milk in a large saucepan. Cover with cold water. Bring to a simmer over medium-high heat, then cook, covered with a weighted lid, over low heat for 3 1/2 hours. Do not uncover or touch the can whilst it cooks as it may explode.

Turn off the heat, then leave to cool completely (for at least 2 hours) before removing the can. Ensure that the can is completely cold before opening it. Transfer the caramel to a bowl, add in 1/2 tsp sea salt flakes and stir to combine completely. Cover and refrigerate whilst you make your biscuits.

For the shortbread biscuits: Combine flour, sugar, cinnamon and 1/4 tsp fine sea salt in a bowl. Dice the butter and add it to the dry mixture gradually, rubbing it in until the mixture comes together. Knead until a dough forms, then wrap in plastic wrap and refrigerate for 30 minutes or until firm.

Roll the dough out to 5mm thickness on a floured work surface, then cut into rounds using an upturned glass or a 5.5cm diameter cookie cutter (re-roll the scraps). Transfer to flat, even baking trays lined with baking paper, then refrigerate for 30 minutes. Meanwhile, preheat your oven to 180 degrees C. Remove the biscuits from the refrigerator once chilled, and transfer directly to oven. Bake for 15-20 minutes or until golden. Cool for 5 minutes on the tray, then transfer to wire racks to cool completely.

To serve: Spread half of the cookies with dulce de leche. Sprinkle on a few flakes of the extra sea salt, then top with the remaining biscuits. Place onto a wire rack.

spreadcircle

Temper your chocolate (I’m not going to go into the finer details here, see David Lebovitz’s guide or my friend Trixie’s blog for instructions), then brush one half and sides of each biscuit with melted chocolate.

dip dipped

Tempered chocolate cools fast, so if you’ve processed your chocolate properly the coating should set within the hour. Turn over and brush the other side with melted chocolate, stand until set (as explained above, I placed all of my melted chocolate into a shallow bowl and dipped half of each biscuit into it. After allowing excess chocolate to drain, I placed the biscuits onto lined trays to set).

chocolate

Store your biscuits in an airtight container in a cool place for up to four days.

the-speckled-palate-blog-banner-MOVING

A huge thanks to the gorgeous Erin also for the opportunity to participate in the event that is Christmas Cookie Week. Make sure you check out The Speckled Palate‘s official link for much more cookie goodness!

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